Eau de parfum Aziyadé Parfum d’Empire

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Eau de parfum Aziyadé Parfum d’Empire is a 2008 Woody Spicy Perfume by Empire perfume for unisex. The perfumer artist behind this fragrance is Marc-antoine Corticchiato . Top notes are Cardamom, Orange, Ginger. Middle notes are Cinnamon, Cumin. Base notes are Patchouli, Vanilla, White musks, Incense, Labdanum.

Eau de parfum Aziyadé Parfum d’Empire
Eau de parfum Aziyadé Parfum d’Empire

Description

  • Aziyadé, the woody spice of Parfum d’Empire

From then on, Aziyadé appears to be a concentrate of sensuality similar to an aphrodisiac. This mixes candied fruits, spices, and precious resins for a sweet, carnal, and daring flavor.

Aziyadé, a novel, turned into a perfume.

Before being a perfume, Aziyadé is the name of a novel by Pierre Loti, which was published anonymously in 1879. Its theme is a love story taking place in an exotic setting in Turkey between 1876 and 1877. This concerns an officer of the European navy and a young woman from the harem of a rich older adult in Istanbul. Pierre Loti himself called his novel a “Turkish romance.” Everything is then written in the form of a diary and correspondence, a daring idea that no doubt seduced the boundless creativity of Marc-Antoine Corticchiato, perfumer of the house Parfum d’Empire. Aziyadé is a fragrance that plunges us into the heart of a harem in the twilight of the Ottoman Empire. Aziyadé’s theme is the forbidden fruit and impossible love. It is at the same time charged with tenderness, forbidden, passion and eroticism. Also, it is precisely on this contrast of emotions and flavors that the Aziyadé perfume is based.

The intoxication of forbidden love revisited by Parfum d’Empire

Aziyadé is a perfume that is loaded with symbols. Its scent begins with an explosive accord of pomegranate, a fruit that is born from the blood of Dionysus, the god of drunkenness. Then, the whole becomes more candied and syrupy thanks to the presence of dates, almonds, prunes, oranges, and aphrodisiac spices. In addition, Aziyadé lets out aromas of cardamom, a plant dear to the Egyptians. This is quickly joined by Ceylon cinnamon, an ingredient that the Romans offered the goddess Venus. Ginger, meanwhile, lets all its aphrodisiac power explode here, while Egyptian cumin, prized in the Sumerian Empire during sacred prostitution rituals, still warms the whole thing with its erotic flavor. Aziyade then seems to contain tobacco leaves. However, it is not so. This ingredient’s evocation is obtained thanks to a clever blend of Indian patchouli and vanilla absolute. Again, know the Aztec Empire considered that vanilla to be an aphrodisiac plant. Carob pods and tears of incense also complete this particularly bewitching composition. Nevertheless, its sensuality would be nothing without a base of musk associated with cistus absolute, whose resinous facets are clearly overdosed here. Everything then leaves behind an unforgettable and fascinating imprint, like Aziyadé’s first smile etched forever in the officer’s memory … vanilla absolute. Again, know the Aztec Empire considered that vanilla to be an aphrodisiac plant. Carob pods and tears of incense also complete this particularly bewitching composition. Nevertheless, its sensuality would be nothing without a base of musk associated with cistus absolute, whose resinous facets are clearly overdosed here. Everything then leaves behind an unforgettable and fascinating imprint, like Aziyadé’s first smile etched forever in the officer’s memory … vanilla absolute. Again, know the Aztec Empire considered that vanilla to be an aphrodisiac plant. Carob pods and tears of incense also complete this particularly bewitching composition. Nevertheless, its sensuality would be nothing without a base of musk associated with cistus absolute, whose resinous facets are clearly overdosed here. Everything then leaves behind an unforgettable and fascinating imprint, like Aziyadé’s first smile etched forever in the officer’s memory … its sensuality would be nothing without a base of musk associated with cistus absolute, the resinous facets of which are clearly overdosed here. Everything then leaves behind an unforgettable and fascinating imprint, like Aziyadé’s first smile etched forever in the officer’s memory … its sensuality would be nothing without a base of musk associated with cistus absolute, the resinous facets of which are clearly overdosed here. Everything then leaves an unforgettable and fascinating imprint, like Aziyadé’s first smile etched forever in the officer’s memory …

Released in 2008, “ Aziyadé ”symbolizes a concentrate of elixir. Carnal and even provocative, “Aziyadé” is the 10th fragrance from designer Marc-Antoine Corticchiato. Taken to the extreme, the “Aziyadé” fragrance is considered an olfactory interpretation of female flesh. Made of lust and oriental scents, the “Aziyadé” fragrance is mixed. You should know that “Aziyadé” is an eponymous novel by Pierre Loti released in 1879. The book’s theme is a love story, which evolves in the exotic setting of Turkey between a European naval officer and a young woman from the harem of a rich older adult.

Marc-Antoine Cortocchiato and his tenth Aziydé fragrance

If Marc-Antoine Corticchiato lived in Corsica, he was born in Morocco. Initially, Marc-Antoine Corticchiato, who adores horses, intended for a horse career. However, his desire to understand the composition of perfumes led him to study chemistry and plant extracts. He will then complete his knowledge by integrating the prestigious Versailles school of perfumery, ISIPCA. Very demanding in the choice and quality of the plants he uses, Marc-Antoine Corticchiato sets up an essential oil production unit in Madagascar. In 2002, Marc-Antoine Corticchiato founded “Parfum d’Empire,” allowing him to express his style fully. Discreet but ultra-talented, Marc-Antoine Corticchiato is at the origin of great olfactory successes such as “Tabac Tabou,” “3 Fleurs,” or “Ottoman Empire.”

Aziyadé, notes of luxury

As a true aphrodisiac elixir, “Aziyadé” takes off on a cocktail of Mediterranean sweet notes, namely those of date, pomegranate, candied fruit. Originally from North Africa, the date is the fruit of the date palm. Brought back from crusades with other dried fruits, the date is sweet, high in calories, and carbohydrates. For Arabs, the date is the symbol of conjugal love. In perfumery, the date is part of the “fruity” olfactory family. The data is synthetically reproduced in the laboratory and is found mainly in oriental compositions. Then, the heart of “Aziyadé” is spicy and aphrodisiac to perfection because it combines cardamom, Ceylon cinnamon, Egyptian cumin, and Chinese ginger. Originally from the East, cumin was a smoking spice. Cumin is harvested six weeks after being sown. The stems, about fifty centimeters high, will be mown before the fruits are still ripe. In the Middle Ages, a small bag of cumin seeds protected against bad luck. Cumin was also used for its many medicinal properties, such as bloating. In perfumery, dried and crushed seeds are steam distilled. Cumin gives off spicy, green, powerful, and anise tones. Finally, the base of “Aziyadé” is ultra-sensual, even carnal, thanks to the presence of cistus labdanum, patchouli, olibanum, white musks, and vanilla for an unforgettable trail.

Additional information

Specification: Eau de parfum Aziyadé Parfum d’Empire

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